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OUR VISION FOR FOOD BY 2050

A regenerative and equitable food system producing healthy, safe and nourishing food for all.

01

EVERYONE HAS ACCESS TO NUTRITIOUS AND AFFORDABLE FOOD

02

SUSTAINABLE PRODUCTION RESTORES AND SAFEGUARDS NATURE

03

FOOD IS CONSUMED SUSTAINABLY

04

VALUE CHAINS ARE PROSPEROUS, EQUITABLE AND FREE FROM HUMAN RIGHTS ABUSES

KEY TRANSITIONS

AGRICULTURE BECOMES MORE PRODUCTIVE, REGENERATIVE, AND RESILIENT

  • Farmers combine traditional techniques with advanced precision farming technologies and inputs.
  • Climate-smart agricultural practices are scaled up, with agriculture increasingly functioning as a carbon sink.
  • Food production is confined to existing farmland, and companies establish supply chains that are free from deforestation and land conversion.
  • The human and environmental risk from inputs in agriculture is continuously reduced and their use is optimized, minimizing environmental impacts.
  • Agricultural subsidies are reoriented to incentivize sustainable farming practices and halt deforestation.
  • Animal husbandry operates within planetary boundaries and regenerative capacities. Animal welfare is increasingly protected.

THE FOOD SYSTEM SUPPORTS A HEALTHY, PRODUCTIVE AND WELL-GOVERNED OCEAN

  • Business plays a leading role in multi-stakeholder initiatives to guarantee that the world’s oceans are effectively managed, and endangered aquatic populations are protected and restored.
  • Overfishing is halted.
  • Business innovates new sources of nutrients for fish feed, allowing the fish farming industry to grow sustainably.
  • Emerging technologies enable seafood traceability at scale.
  • Cross-sector collaboration and investment tackle the issue of marine plastic.

DIETS BECOME HEALTHY AND SUSTAINABLE

  • Diets shift to become more balanced and optimized for health and environmental outcomes.
  • Companies adjust their product portfolios to make it easy and attractive for consumers to make healthy dietary choices.
  • Business innovation helps to develop and scale an array of new healthy and sustainable protein sources.
  • Businesses adopt responsible marketing strategies that support the transition to healthy and sustainable diets and move away from promoting unhealthy options.

THE WORLD MOVES TOWARDS A CIRCULAR FOOD SYSTEM WITH ZERO LOSS AND WASTE

  • Businesses lead the way in reducing food loss and waste from farm to fork by developing metrics, setting targets and pioneering innovative new practices and technologies.
  • Public awareness and advertising campaigns stimulate a large and rapid shift in social norms that makes wasting food unacceptable.
  • Unavoidable waste along the food value chain is redistributed or harnessed for applications in materials or energy as part of an increasingly thriving circular bioeconomy.

EQUITABLE DISTRIBUTION OF VALUE THROUGHOUT THE FOOD VALUE CHAIN

  • Companies collaborate to ensure that value is shared fairly with farmers and fisherpeople, helping to eradicate poverty and drive rural development.
  • Companies help build capacity among farmers to adopt new practices and technologies that are more productive, resilient and regenerative.
  • Business, governments, and civil society work together to ensure a just transition, building resilience and creating new jobs in the rural economy.
  • Human rights are protected and respected throughout the food value chain.

END-TO-END TRANSPARENCY IS BUILT FROM FARM
TO FORK

  • Businesses, civil society groups, policymakers and investors collaborate to achieve end-to-end traceability across food supply chains.
  • New levels of data ensure responsible and sustainable sourcing, increased farmer income, and reduced food loss and waste.
  • Access to data enhances companies’ capacity to account for the true value of natural, social and human capital in food supply chains.
  • Consumers benefit from more information on where and how their food is produced, enabling healthy and sustainable choices.

THE TRUE VALUE AND COST OF FOOD IS ACKNOWLEDGED AND ACCOUNTED FOR

  • Momentum grows behind new approaches that assess the true value and cost of food.
  • Companies scale efforts to measure and value their dependencies on natural, social, and human capital, as well as the positive and negative impacts of their operations and supply chains.
  • Businesses use this information to make decisions and mitigate long-term risks to their business, people, society, and the environment. This information is also increasingly leveraged by investors and policymakers.

FOOD

ACTION AREAS FOR BUSINESS

2021-2030

01

Adopt and disseminate agricultural and aquaculture practices that are resilient, regenerative, circular, and that produce higher yields with higher levels of nutrition.

02

Evolve and invest in redesigned food product portfolios to reduce environmental externalities, provide healthier options, and maximize positive impacts on people and planet. In particular, drive R&D around protein substitution with a focus on disruptive technologies and re-imagined animal feed sources.

03

Through marketing and education campaigns, shift consumer and employee behavior towards more healthy, sustainable food choices and reduced food waste. Refrain from marketing unhealthy foods.

04

Establish deforestation and land use coversion-free food supply chains while also forming and joining global coalitions to invest in restoration efforts.

05

Set targets, develop metrics, and implement practices and programs to minimize food waste across the supply chain. Reimagine food distribution systems that are built upon principles of circularity and reduce the level of packaging required to maintain quality and safety.

06

Set science-based targets for reducing emissions from agricultural production and related land use change to establish a clear, accountable pathway to hold temperature rises to 1.5°C. Turn agriculture into a carbon sink.

07

Engage with policymakers to reorient subsidies and regulations to incentivize sustainable agricultural practices, healthier consumption patterns, and reduced food loss and waste.

08

Develop and improve internal policies and systems to perform human rights due diligence as set out in the UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights and ensure human rights are respected across all food value chains globally.

09

Account for the true value of food by factoring in natural, social and human capital costs. At the same time collaborate to advance transparency and traceability mechanisms throughout the food value chain and drive open access to data.

10

Ensure that value is shared equitably throughout the value chain with farmers and fishermen receiving their fair share.

Most Relevant SDGS

OTHER TRANSFORMATION PATHWAYS

Explore the other critical action areas that will drive
a shift towards a sustainable future

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